Tag Archives: INXS

NUKES AND AUSTRALIAN MUSIC

 

NUKES AND AUSTRALIAN MUSIC

Australian music and politics have been intertwined since Vietnam and its aftermath. Khe Sanh is sometimes called the alternative Australian national anthem. Only Nineteen, by Redgum, continued the tradition set by Don Walker and Cold Chisel, in the Eighties.

THE OILS IN THE EIGHTIES

The early-mid 1980s saw the rise of People for Nuclear Disarmament in Australia. Midnight Oil played strong songs that sold the anti-nuclear message and toured the country widely, educating a generation about nukes. This laminate, from the collection of Marshall Cullen, dates from that time. Hobart was a focus for the anti-nuke protests of the mid 1980’s after the controversial visit of the U.S.S. Enterprise – Peter Garrett was there.

Midnight Oil laminate: Marshall Cullen.
Midnight Oil laminate: Marshall Cullen.

 

STOP THE DROP, 1983

 

 

 

U.S. FORCES GIVE THE NOD

U.S. Forces lyrics which the crowd sing word-for-word in the Stop The Drop clip can be found at Midnight Oil’s official website . The song was written by Jim Moginie and Peter Garrett.

The anthem U.S. Forces name checks Shakespeare (‘dogs of war ‘) as well as the Wall Street TV-speak of the early Eighties (‘market movements call the shots.’)  You can see the crowd mouthing the lines “People too scared to go to prison” at Stop The Drop which was also a reflection of the times. This T-Shirt, below, is in The Powerhouse Museum collection in Sydney.

 

Stop The Drop Concert 1983 Powerhouse Museum T Shirt

Stop The Drop Concert 1983 Powerhouse Museum T Shirt

 

STOP THE DROP CONCERT POSTER - Arts Centre Melbourne
STOP THE DROP CONCERT POSTER – Arts Centre Melbourne

 

INXS, GOANNA AND  REDGUM

The Stop the Drop concert held at Melbourne’s Myer Music Bowl on Sunday 13 February 1983 was attended by the T-shirt donor you see responsible for the Powerhouse Museum archive donation on this page – Kevin Fewster  – who also happened to be one of the organisers.

The 1983 concert was attended by 8000 people. In 1984 Peter Garrett was to run for the Australian Senate in NSW for the Nuclear Disarmament Party but was not elected.

Also at this concert, members of Goanna, Midnight Oil and Redgum recorded an impromptu song to protest the proposed damming of Tasmania’s Franklin River. Released as ‘Let The Franklin Flow’ by Gordon Franklin and the Wilderness Ensemble, it reached number 15 on the charts in May that year.

 
10 9 8

 

PLUTONIUM WIFE

The line “Superboy takes a plutonium wife” might just be one of the most mis-heard in Australian music, but ‘sing me songs of no denying’ is something most Australian music fans would automatically attribute to the band. The album was huge in the early 1980’s and together with Red Sails In The Sunset (which shows Sydney after the bomb) politicised part of a generation.

 THE RANGER URANIUM MINE

Between 1979 and 1984, the majority of what is now Kakadu National Park was created, surrounding but not including the Ranger uranium mine.  The two themes for the 1980 Hiroshima Day march and rally in Sydney, sponsored by the Movement Against Uranium Mining (MAUM), were: “Keep uranium in the ground” and “No to nuclear war.” Later that year, the Sydney city council officially proclaimed Sydney nuclear-free.

The Nobel-prize winning Australian novelist Patrick White led one such march, and was photographed  with Tom Uren, pictured with dark glasses, bag and stick. This is his novel The Eye of the Storm.

 

Patrick White

 

RUBBERY FIGURES, RONALD REAGAN AND MIDNIGHT OIL

By 1982, there were 350,000 Australians at anti-nuclear rallies, focussed on halting Australia’s uranium exports, removing foreign bases from Australian land and creating a nuclear-free Pacific. The visits of U.S. nuclear warships – as far as Hobart – was also a major early Eighties issue and Midnight Oil sang the soundtrack.

The comedy puppet series Rubbery Figures (ABC-TV 1984-1990) satirised U.S. President Ronald Reagan in the same period. To put Midnight Oil’s anti-nuclear albums 10, 9, 8 and Red Sails in context, it’s also important to remember that in 1984, shortly after both records (still vinyl) were released, President Reagan joked in a soundcheck on National Public Radio,  ‘My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today that I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.’

Rubbery Figures – Ronald Regan re Anzac Day


THE BOMB AND THE EIGHTIES

Writing in Meanjin, Simon Castles remembers, ‘In 1984 the Doomsday Clock kept by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists was moved to three minutes to midnight, its most dire position since the invention of the hydrogen bomb. Midnight Oil released Red Sails in the Sunset the same year, an album whose cover shows Sydney after a nuclear strike.’

‘In the eighties there was a stack of pop songs about the bomb. To name just a handful of tracks on a list that ran long, as if to a mushroom cloud on the horizon: ‘Breathing’ by Kate Bush (1980), ‘1999’ by Prince (1982), ‘Seconds’ by U2 (1983), ‘99 Luftballons’ by Nena (1983), ‘Walking in Your Footsteps’ by The Police (1983), ‘Two Minute Warning’ by Depeche Mode (1983), ‘Forever Young’ by Alphaville and then Laura Branigan (1984–85), ‘Two Tribes’ by Frankie Goes to Hollywood (1984), ‘Russians’ by Sting (1985), ‘Guns in the Sky’ by INXS (1987) and ‘Everyday is like Sunday’ by Morrissey (1988).’

You can read more in Meanjin online

RED SAILS ART

Red Sails in the Sunset was a title more associated with Bing Crosby and Fats Domino in the Eighties – until Midnight Oil took it over with the help of a Japanese artist who was years ahead of his time. American blogger Sam Wade, writes at The Vinyl Odyssey:

“Japanese artist, Tsunehisa Kimura, created the post-apocalyptic vision of Sydney Harbor – no water only craters from nuclear bombs and a giant fireball near the bridge. It’s one of the coolest photomontages I’ve seen and it stuck with me even more because I have family in Australia. But remember, this record came out in 1984, six years before Photoshop 1.0 would ever hit the streets. In this digital age, it’s easy to forget that this type of art was much more painstaking and analog to create.”

The Vinyl Odyssey: Red Sails In The Sunset – Midnight Oil

 

RED SAILS IN THE SUNSET BING CROSBY
RED SAILS IN THE SUNSET BING CROSBY

 

RED SAILS IN THE SUNSET FATS DOMINO
RED SAILS IN THE SUNSET FATS DOMINO

 

MIDNIGHT OIL RED SAILS TAPE
MIDNIGHT OIL RED SAILS TAPE at WWW.EBAY.COM

 

NO DAMS

Dr Sarah Engledow, Historian and Curator at the National Portrait Gallery of Australia, wrote in Portrait magazine.

“In 1983, in an international climate of increased public involvement in protest, the Australian local news was dominated by environmental demonstrations on two fronts. The first was the Tasmanian NO DAMS campaign, making highly professional and effective use of photographs by Peter Dombrovskis,a wilderness photographer mentored by Olegas Truchanas. The second was the anti-nuclear movement. In February 1983 Midnight Oil helped organise the Stop the Drop concert in Melbourne, and headlined the event. That year, Tom Uren and Peter Garrett marched together at the head of an anti-nuclear protest. In 1984, when Tom Uren and Patrick White walked side by side at the front of an Australians for Nuclear Disarmament march and Peter Garrett stood unsuccessfully for the Senate on behalf of the Nuclear Disarmament Party, Midnight Oil released the album Red Sails in the Sunset, featuring sinisterly surreal cover artwork by Tsunehisa Kimura of the Sydney Harbour Bridge spanning an expanse of cratered red dirt, a bomb-like ball glowing lava-hot beside the Opera House. The following year, the Oils’ EP Species Deceases came with album notes on the theme of Hiroshima forty years on. Including the great track ‘Hercules’, Species Deceases was an exasperated exhortation to action: ‘Come to your senses and care/16 million I can’t hear you at all’, Garrett cried.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Classic Countdown! Music Map

 

CLASSIC COUNTDOWN! MUSIC MAP

 

The Countdown Map
The Countdown Map

An interactive Australian music map, inspired by the old Classic Countdown map, is an ongoing story at AMMP where we add new map pins every month.

NEW SOUTH WALES

Aunty Jack – Wollongong. The entire town. The Aunty Jack album ‘Aunty Jack Sings Wollongong’ features a young Norman Gunston with his Gunstonettes singing ‘Wollongong the Brave.’ Aunty Jack was at the inauguration of colour television in Australia on 1 March 1975. The special beat ABC’s commercial rivals by beginning 3 minutes early, at 11:57 pm 28 March 1975 in black and white and then wiping to colour at midnight.

 

YouTube Farewell Aunty Jack (song)

 

SYDNEY

The Marble Bar at The Hilton Hotel on George Street, Sydney is where Cold Chisel were photographed for their album Breakfast at Sweethearts. Sweethearts in Kings Cross no longer exists but a brass plaque in the pavement marks its location.

Cold Chisel made Sydney their own.
Cold Chisel made Sydney their own.

THE EASYBEATS/AC/DC FAMILY HOME

This before/after shot (Twitter, Pinterest) shows the Young family at 4 Burleigh Street, Burwood.

 

4 Burleigh Street, Burwood (Twitter).
4 Burleigh Street, Burwood (Twitter).

 

THE CIVIC HOTEL, PITT STREET 
Mental as Anything featuring Greedy Smith (below, in a portrait by Paul Worstead) made The Civic Hotel on Pitt Street in the centre of Sydney their own. The old Phantom Records shop was steps away.

The Paul Worstead portrait of Greedy Smith, Mental as Anything.
The Paul Worstead portrait of Greedy Smith, Mental as Anything.

THE HOODOO GURUS
The Hoodoo Gurus are a Sydney band not identified with any one venue, but as Le Hoodoo Gurus, they played The Mosman Hotel, Mosman.

Hoodoo Gurus poster from the brilliant website 1980schild.blogspot.com.au
Hoodoo Gurus poster from the brilliant website 1980schild.blogspot.com.au
MELBOURNE
Skyhooks poster 1970s
Skyhooks poster 1970s

SKYHOOKS
Skyhooks created songs about whole suburbs in Melbourne. Carlton and Balwyn are just two of those namechecked.

HUNTERS AND COLLECTORS
Westgate after the song by Mark Seymour – but also Ormond College, University of Melbourne where John Archer, Doug Falconer and Mark Seymour first met on the way to forming Hunters and Collectors.

ST. KILDA
From St Kilda to Kings Cross by Paul Kelly and the Coloured Girls  is just part of the St. Kilda story. So many bands are associated with the area and still play there – like Cold Chisel’s Don Walker – that it has a permanent pin on the Countdown Map.

Time Out

Festival Hall needs no introduction, thanks to Sherbet, Daddy Cool and unknown third support act AC/DC.

ACDC support Sherbet
THE COUNTDOWN STUDIOS, RIPPONLEA
This is where Classic Countdown was filmed and there is a fascinating story on the closure of the old ABC-TV Dream Factory here. Devoted fans including The Countdown Sisters used to make the pilgrimage. Follow them here. (Images: ABC Archives, Twitter, Instagram).

classic coutndown dsisters utndwon club

Ian Meldrum filming Countdown. ABC Archives.
Ian Meldrum filming Countdown. ABC Archives.

NORTHERN TERRITORY

Arnhem Land – Yothu Yindi
Aboriginal members of Yothu Yindi came from Yolngu homelands near Yirrkala on the Gove Peninsula in Northern Territory’s Arnhem Land.

ACT

D.A.A.S. – Canberra
You could use up a lot of pins on Google Maps just trying to follow all the busking spots where the Doug Anthony Allstars put their guitar cases down. D.A.A.S. began performing as buskers on the streets of Canberra in 1984, while they were attending university.

NEW! Chrissy Amphlett Street
Melbourne has Amphlett Lane. Canberra now has Amphlett Street. Divinyls fans, start your engines. (Photograph: Twitter @AmphlettLane)

Amphlett Street Canberra named after Chrissy Amphlett.
Amphlett Street Canberra named after Chrissy Amphlett.
SOUTH AUSTRALIA

AC/DC – Largs Pier hotel, Adelaide
During the 70s and 80s Largs hosted Jimmy Barnes with Cold Chisel, AC/DC, The Little River Band and The Angels. Bon Scott, who later became the lead singer of AC/DC, met his wife at the Largs Pier Hotel after a gig in 1971.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Dave Warner From The Suburbs – The Victoria Hotel, Perth
Watch ‘Half Time at the Football’ on YouTube – Dave Warner – “Half-time at the Football” (1981)

Backstage Passes - Greg Phillips
Backstage Passes – Greg Phillips

INXS – Davidson High School, Perth. Imagine this. After recess, Andrew Farriss convincing his fellow Davidson High School classmate, Michael Hutchence, to join his band, Doctor Dolphin.The rest is history. If not actually a band called Doctor Dolphin.

TASMANIA

The Innocents with singer Charlie Tauber put Hobart on the Countdown map when they appeared on the show. Sooner or Later is a power pop classic.

QUEENSLAND

The Saints – Corinda High School.
Author and journalist Clinton Walker:  “I first became aware of the Saints in 1974, while living in Brisbane. I had transferred to a new school, Corinda High. There, in art class, I met a gaggle of antisocial young long hairs that revolved around an embryonic band called the Saints. Perhaps the strongest common bond I had initially with the guys in art was that we all hated hippies. I fell in with them, and it wasn’t long before I fell in the Saints’ thrall too.”
Read more: Raven Records – The Saints – Wild About You 1976-1978

 

RAM Magazine anniversary editions, photographed by owner Michael Witheford
RAM Magazine anniversary editions, photographed by owner Michael Witheford

 

The Go Between Bridge – The Go Betweens
The Go Between Bridge, formerly known as the Hale Street Link, is a toll bridge for vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists over the Brisbane River in inner-city Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Countdown GPO Box Melbourne
Countdown GPO Box Melbourne

 

THE COUNTDOWN MAP ON TWITTER
Follow @ammptv on Twitter and send us your map suggestions.

Classic Countdown! From Twitter @ABCTV
Classic Countdown! From Twitter @ABCTV

Collecting Australian Music

Naomi Dinnen's musical memories.
Naomi Dinnen’s musical memories.

Collecting Australian Music

Thanks to AC/DC but also obscure Australian artists like Leong Lau (his 1977 album is currently selling for $1574) the backstage passes, tickets, vinyl and other collectables from Down Under are now seen as a good investment.

Naomi Dinnen, part of whose personal collection was kindly  photographed by her for AMMP, had more than a decade in the music industry, successfully publishing an independent music magazine. She was a columnist for Rolling Stone, Drum Media, 3D World and Juice Magazines, worked for EMI Music and PolyGram Records.  Not everyone has a collection of laminates but they can and do turn up at street markets and garage sales – and on eBay.

 Collecting Go-Set Magazines

Go-Set magazines retail for around AUD$50 online. They are already preserved at The State Library of Victoria on film archives and at the National Film and Sound Archive. A copy of Go-Set bought in 1973 for 25 cents has increased in value 200 fold.

 

GERRY ON TV BILLY THORPE amazing_west_coast-lr_ruqkrmi

 

Collecting Nick Cave 

Nick Cave is one of the few Australian musicians to have crossed the threshold from ‘muso’ to sought-after museum, art gallery and library name. This famous photograph by Bleddyn Butcher (below) appeared in an exhibition on Australian Bohemia, presented at The State Library of Victoria.

Euchrid’s Crib, a gelatin silver photograph, taken in West Berlin on 3rd August 1985 captured Nick Cave when he was writing his novel And the Ass Saw the Angel  and Butcher’s title identifies the character from Cave’s book. This was both Cave’s  bedroom and study, complete with human hair.

When Australian musicians cross the line from gigs to galleries, libraries and museums, prices tend to rise accordingly.

This photograph of Nick Cave with Rowland S. Howard (and unfortunate cat) taken by Peter Milne was part of his superb Juvenilia exhibition at the Strange Neighbour gallery in Fitzroy, Melbourne.

Ballarat painter Casey Tosh captured Nick Cave in a portrait which has also found its way onto T-Shirts. He has also drawn Warren Ellis, a former Ballarat resident. The fact that Tosh has also created a whole laneway of street art dedicated to Rowland S. Howard in Ballarat may one day make his paintings and T-shirts collectable.

 

NICK BLEDDYN SHOT MILNE PHOTOS NICK CAVE BY CASEY TOSH WARREN ELIS BY CASEY TOSH

 

Paper Investments

What to watch for –
Australian magazines and street press that has a) vanished and b) escaped household recycling bins could be tomorrow’s Go-Set.

Bon Scott (seen here pointing to Juke magazine) has left a paper trail which is worth collecting.  On the Street, Drum Media and Ram are also worth watching out for.  Tony Mott, the Australian photographer who has exhibited widely and also produced a number of books, has helped to make what used to be free street press, collectable (below).

Australian music posters are best represented in Plastered  by Murray Walding with Nick Vukovic (The Miegunyah Press, 2005) which is now, by itself, a collectable book. The Hair and Masters Apprentices posters, here, are from Plastered.

 

HAIR AT METRO JUKE BON SCOTT SMASH HITS INXS IMG_5636 RAM JJB OTS OOO MOTT DIVINYLS

The Masters Apprentices at Parramatta Town Hall.
The Masters Apprentices at Parramatta Town Hall.

Vinyl Investments

 

A copy of the Masters Apprentices 1979 album Now That It’s Over signed by the late Jim Keays sells for $80 online. Meanwhile, the Taman Shud Evolution LP is valued at $150

Australian pressings of British punk singles and albums are worth watching. The Clash put out London Calling in a Down Under version in 1979 which is now worth $100.  Looking for an eclectic selection? Try Vicious Sloth. This online store is a good source.

From Radio Birdman/Iggy Pop cancelled tour posters to mint-condition box-sets you may find that your Australiana ends up becoming far more valuable than stamps or coins to collectors.

Most people know that The Beatles Yesterday and Today is worth a lot of money (about $995 as we head towards 2020).

 

Who knew that a Tasmanian Christian folk group called The Ascension Four would put out an album worth $65 today, though?

Age and obscurity are not always the keys to a good investment, though. Famous, recent names like Magic Dirt are worth watching. You can buy a poster advertising a gig with Magic Dirt and Rowland S. Howard at The Corner Hotel on 29th October 2008 for $124.99

The poster was free at the time. So was the poster advertising a Nick Cave story in The Monthly magazine – now worth $84.99.

Nick Cave posters are highly collectable.
Nick Cave posters are highly collectable.

 

Start Small or Start Big?

Start small or start big? You don’t have to have a huge outlay to start collecting and vinyl is easily stored and portable.

Artists within bands – who contributed to memorable sleeve art – include Mental As Anything. Vinyl singles with iconic Australiana may help you to up your investment one day. Try  the Mental as Anything ‘Creatures of Leisure’ single for $20.

Sometimes mysteries occur in the marketplace and That Rongeng Sound by Leong Lau is one of them. Asking price? $1574.62 online.

The Beatles in Australia

There are two redesigned Antipodean Beatles covers – Beatles for Sale (tour photographs) and With the Beatles.

An Australian promotional copy of The White Album on eBay is $6000. One of the reasons for this is the censored photograph of a naked John Lennon on the poster which came with the album.

What to Watch

Bands like The Sunnyboys who found their career revived with a television documentary are now seen as an investment. Their self-titled, limited-edition, yellow vinyl album is now $325.

The Sunnyboys on yellow vinyl $325.
The Sunnyboys on yellow vinyl $325.

Midnight Oil posters are worth a long look as the band’s touring exhibition  and its important place in Australian political history is bound to make them desirable to the investors of the future. Blank Canvas Australia sell this poster (from Noosa, below) for almost $250.  It’s also strange but true that a mere flier, from a band like INXS, is now worth $49.99 online.

It is worth trawling eBay, record collectors’ fairs, secondhand shops and open-air markets to see what you can find.

Should this single (below) turn up in a car-boot sale, though, you’d better snap it up. This is God Save the Queen by The Sex Pistols on A&M Records and it’s currently worth $24,411.

Do you have a photograph of your Australian music memorabilia you’d like to share with AMMP? Please let us know. Thank you.

The Sex Pistols' famous single $24, 411
The Sex Pistols’ famous single $24, 411

 

 

This Oils poster is worth $249.99
This Oils poster is worth $249.99

INXS Flier 49 99

Collecting Australian music – this INXS flier measures up.

 

 

 

 

Portraits of Michael Hutchence

 

Portraits of Michael Hutchence

The internet and media portrait of Michael Hutchence is as contradictory as the iconic Max Q face (below). Max Q was a collaboration with Ollie Olsen, whom Michael had met while filming Dogs In Space. There are many portraits of Michael Hutchence.

Talking to the late Vince Lovegrove in his biography of Michael Hutchence (Allen & Unwin 1999) Olsen said, “I think he was a person who was kind of caught up on this rollercoaster of fame and there was a part of him that perhaps was on a more spiritual level.”

Max Q was then born in Los Angeles and according to Michael’s brother Rhett Hutchence, the latter mortgaged his Paddington house to pay for the recording.

Greg Perano, an old friend of Michael’s, believed that if the Max Q project was too successful, INXS management was concerned it would take Michael away from the band. Speaking to Lovegrove, he commented ‘They wanted it to be a faceless record.’ Thus, the first portrait we have of Michael Hutchence, below. Here, he is just one of the many faces of Max Q.

IDENTIKIT! MICHAEL AS MAX Q

Michael Hutchence talking to SPIN Magazine about his Max Q side project with Ollie Olsen, said:

“Max Q is a title that Ollie was just bandying about. “I want to do a Max Q thing.” It was a month later that I found out it was the name of his dog – which I shouldn’t have mentioned – his deaf dog. A mad, fucking, frothing-at-the-mouth, barking, biting, table-chewing dog. That’s the beginning of it. What it turned into was this guy we could create. This idea of taking pieces of everybody and creating this persona: Max. So it’s not a solo album for me – which it isn’t technically – and it’s not just this band. It’s this alter ego we’ve created out of everyone. The weird thing is we wanted to make the logo really ugly, with this police identikit sort of thing, and it turned out to be this guy, this person. We were quite happy with it and kept it. That’s Max.”

 

The iconic Max Q portrait of Michael Hutchence.
The iconic Max Q cover stands out in all the  portraits of Michael Hutchence.

 

s-l225 MAX_Q_WAY_OF_THE_WORLD_PICTURE_DISC_SHAPE_2963

Max Q still from YouTube.
Max Q still from YouTube.

THE TONY MOTT PORTRAITS
Tony Mott’s recent Sydney photographic exhibition What a Life
  also drew thousands of fans, at the State Library of NSW. Veteran Australian media photographer Tony Mott (below) captured Michael in a classic portrait, blown up to larger-than-life size. One shot from the session appeared, literally, on ‘the cover of Rolling Stone’ in Australia. Michael’s smile still attracts female fans (below). The photograph also appears on the biography by Vince Lovegrove (Allen & Unwin).

 

Tony Mott's portrait of Michael Hutchence was part of a long career in media.
Tony Mott’s portrait of Michael Hutchence was part of a long career in media.


Michael Hutchence portrait at the State Library of NSW.
Michael Hutchence portrait at the State Library of NSW. Australian portraits of Michael Hutchence on public display are rare.

 

Michael Hutchence by Tony Mott for Rolling Stone Australia.
One of many portraits of Michael Hutchence – Tony Mott for Rolling Stone Australia.
Michael Hutchence by Vince Lovegrove (Allen and Unwin).
Michael Hutchence by Vince Lovegrove (Allen and Unwin).


DISCOVERING THE HARRY BORDEN PORTRAIT

Interview with Harry Borden
In this interview clip, below,  Harry Borden describes the experience of photographing  Michael Hutchence on location in Paris. All the images in this interview are copyright Harry Borden. 

Further information about the Michael Hutchence portrait by Harry Borden can be found on the Gallery’s website http://www.portrait.gov.au 

 

 

THE POLLY BORLAND PORTRAIT OF MICHAEL HUTCHENCE
Visit The National Portrait Gallery online to see an alternative portrait of Michael Hutchence captured by Polly Borland.  This Rolling Stone cover shows yet another face of the singer.

RICHARD LOWENSTEIN’S PORTRAITS
The Ghost Pictures channel on YouTube showcases some of the amazing work created by Richard Lowenstein over the years, including this lesser-known INXS clip (Property Ghost Pictures). 

 

 

 

THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY ON YOUTUBE
Subscribe to the National Portrait Gallery’s YouTube channel at: http://goo.gl/GYIgsq for more rock’n’roll art works and insights.